Lesson Help is Here!

There is a point in every school counselor’s life when everything begins to pile up. It’s at this very moment that we realize our creative lesson planning has taken a back seat. 

I was trying to think what I needed most during these times. READY TO USE LESSONS! I needed a place where I could go that would have everything I needed in one place. And not just a creative, cutesy lesson, but one that built on our ASCA mindsets and behaviors  AND also hit all my students’ social-emotional goals. 

Well that’s exactly what I’ve decided to offer you! You see I may not be in the school every day any more, but every day I do hear how much my lessons made a difference and how much my kiddos miss me. So, if I can’t use them, someone should!  Continue reading →

A Healthy Amount of Curiosity Never Killed The Cat

Our 4th new character skill was curiosity. This one was especially hard to teach because so many students were taught that curiosity would get them into trouble. I had to reframe their thinking into remembering that curiosity leads us to learn new things. All learning starts when we are first curious about something.

I taught grades K-6 a variation on the same lesson and I have them all . . . yes I know it’s a lot . . . outlined below. I have labeled them by grade level, so feel free to skip down to the one that most interests you.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 1.19.55 PM Continue reading →

Your Outlook on Life

We’ve all heard the saying, “Seeing the world through rose colored glasses.” Little do we know, children are looking at their world through all sorts of different colored lenses.

During a lesson with my 2nd graders, we discussed how certain feelings will make us see things differently. They will make us look at the world, the problem, the situation, and our friends differently. The lesson helped us recognize these lenses and how we can fix our lenses to see things clearly.

N A T U R E Continue reading →

Everything is Awesome

Back in December, I switched my character skills to some that might have more learning potential than our original 6 traits that we practiced in the past. You may remember my post about this. We began with Grit, moved into Optimism, and then on to Zest. Continue reading →

Promoting Your Program Through Monthly Newsletters

I apologize for the throughly lame title to this post . . . but I honestly couldn’t think of a cute, witty title  . . . Don’t judge a book by it’s cover, I promise this will be worth the read!

Last year, I started writing up monthly newsletters for the parents. I wanted to promote my program, so they knew what their child was learning during “Character Education.” During my first year of counseling (as the first counselor at the school), I kept battling parents who were truly angry when they heard their child came to see me or that I went into the classroom to teach a lesson. They figured if their child saw the counselor then there was one of two problems:

1. Their child was spilling all the family secrets

and/or

2. Something was wrong with their child and he would come talk to me

and inadvertently, even though he was only 4, he would spill all the family secrets. Continue reading →

Fishing for Feelings

My favorite part of this lesson was it’s particular way of raging against my typical lesson format (story, lesson, written activity). Not that I’d say I’m stuck in a lesson format rut, but why change what’s not broken. I guess it’s the teacher in me that feels everything needs a written (assessment) component. Continue reading →

Using Heart Talk

There are very few things I remember about my school counselor when I was in elementary school, a few more things about my middle school counselor, and maybe one more after that about my high school counselor. Continue reading →